Farkas eye black - vintage eye black grease for baseball, football, lacrosse, and more Blog

Feb 02 2014

Super Bowl Winning Quarterbacks Wear Eye Black

 

Super Bowl XLVIII is today and there is a lot of talk about how the weather may or may not affect the game. But we wanted to know the answer to a much more important question: how has eye black influenced past super bowls and do winning Super Bowl quarterbacks wear eye black?

To do this, we looked at whether a quarterback traditionally wore eye black throughout his career. If he did, we figured out if he wore grease or stickers. Of course every athlete makes a decision to wear eye black for each individual game, so if we found that a quarterback only seemed to wear eye black every once in a while, then we considered him to not be an avid eye black wearer. We also did our best to determine whether that quarterback wore eye black in his actual Super Bowl game. Of course, many Super Bowls have been played indoors, but that doesn’t mean eye black becomes irrelevant, since Dr. DeBroff has shown that eye black will reduce contrast sensitivity from lights too. Here are the results:

 

Year

Winning QB

Eye Black

Losing QB

Eye Black

1966

Bart Starr*

None

Len Dawson*

None

1967

Bart Starr*

None

Daryle Lamonica

None

1968

Joe Namath*

Grease

Earl Morrall

None

1969

Len Dawson*

None

Joe Kapp

Grease

1970

Johnny Unitas*

None

Craig Morton

None

1971

Roger Staubach*

Grease - Sometimes

Bob Griese*

Grease - Sometimes

1972

Bob Griese*

Grease - Sometimes

Billy Kilmer

None

1973

Bob Griese*

Grease - Sometimes

Fran Tarkenton*

None

1974

Terry Bradshaw*

Grease

Fran Tarkenton*

None

1975

Terry Bradshaw*

Grease

Roger Staubach*

Grease - Sometimes

1976

Ken Stabler

None

Fran Tarkenton*

None

1977

Roger Staubach*

Grease - Sometimes

Craig Morton

None

1978

Terry Bradshaw*

Grease

Roger Staubach*

Grease - Sometimes

1979

Terry Bradshaw*

Grease

Vince Ferragamo

Grease

1980

Jim Plunkett

None

Ron Jaworski

Grease - Sometimes

1981

Joe Montana*

None

Ken Anderson

None

1982

Joe Theismann

Grease

David Woodley

None

1983

Jim Plunkett

None

Joe Theismann

Grease

1984

Joe Montana*

None

Dan Marino*

None

1985

Jim McMahon

None

Tony Eason

None

1986

Phil Simms

None

John Elway*

None

1987

Doug Williams

None

John Elway*

None

1988

Joe Montana*

None

Boomer Esiason

Grease

1989

Joe Montana*

None

John Elway*

None

1990

Jeff Hostetler

None

Jim Kelly*

None

1991

Mark Rypien

None

Jim Kelly*

None

1992

Troy Aikman*

Grease

Jim Kelly*

None

1993

Troy Aikman*

Grease

Jim Kelly*

None

1994

Steve Young*

None

Stan Humphries

None

1995

Troy Aikman*

Grease

Neil O'Donnell

None

1996

Brett Favre

None

Drew Bledsoe

Grease

1997

John Elway*

None

Brett Favre

None

1998

John Elway*

None

Chris Chandler

None

1999

Kurt Warner

None

Steve McNair

None

2000

Trent Dilfer

Grease - Sometimes

Kerry Collins

None

2001

Tom Brady

Grease

Kurt Warner

None

2002

Brad Johnson

None

Rich Gannon

None

2003

Tom Brady

Grease

Jake Delhomme

None

2004

Tom Brady

Grease

Donovan McNabb

None

2005

Ben Roethlisberger

Grease

Matt Hasselbeck

Grease

2006

Peyton Manning

None

Rex Grossman

None

2007

Eli Manning

None

Tom Brady

Grease

2008

Ben Roethlisberger

Grease

Kurt Warner

None

2009

Drew Brees

Grease

Peyton Manning

None

2010

Aaron Rodgers

None

Ben Roethlisberger

Grease

2011

Eli Manning

None

Tom Brady

Grease

2012

Joe Flacco

None

Colin Kaepernick

None

*Denotes NFL Hall of Fame

 

From these results, we determined that of 94 quarterbacks in 47 Super Bowls, 33 quarterbacks wore grease and 61 wore no eye black.

The record for quarterbacks not wearing eye black: 27-34.

The record for quarterbacks wearing eye black grease: 20-13.

We labeled those who wore grease more than 40% of the time, but less than 60% as sometimes wearing grease. If we found a quarterback seemed to wear grease more than 60% of the time, he was deemed as almost always wearing grease. When we take out the quarterbacks we listed as having only used grease “sometimes”, the record is still a winning one. Those quarterbacks who almost always wore eye black grease were 14-9.

The numbers actually become more interesting when you take into account quarterbacks with multiple Super Bowl wins. There are 11 quarterbacks who have won the super bowl more than once. Of those 11, six were grease wearers. Ok, so only just over half you say. But let’s look at those who won the Super Bowl three or four times. This list is limited to Joe Montana (4), Terry Bradshaw (4), Troy Aikman (3), and Tom Brady (3). Of these four quarterbacks, three of them routinely wore eye black grease (Bradshaw, Aikman, and Brady). And their combined record in the Super Bowl is 10-2!

Now one might argue, Joe Montana was 4-0 in his Super Bowl appearances and he did not regularly wear eye black grease. To that we say: “Jerry Rice.” Yes, Montana’s number one receiver (also the number one receiver in NFL history) often wore eye black grease. But of course, then you could look at every other team and their receivers/other key players in the same way. While we’d love to do that, it will have to wait for another day. For now, we’re content with having Jerry Rice as a prime player who often wore eye black grease.

While we’re not going to predict our winner for tomorrow’s game, and there are certainly more factors that go into winning a Super Bowl than eye black, there is some casual evidence supporting quarterbacks who wear eye black grease. But there also is another thing that we can say for certain, none of the Super Bowl winning quarterbacks wore stickers.

Enjoy tomorrow’s Super Bowl matchup! We have no doubt that the athletes will be playing with passion.

 

Out of 94 quarterbacks in 47 games:

QBs Wearing Grease

33

QBs Not Wearing Eye Black

61

Wins

20

Wins

27

Losses

13

Losses

34

  

In 47 Super Bowls:

QB w/Grease defeats None

15

None defeats Grease

8

Grease versus Grease

5

None versus None

19

 

Quarterbacks with Multiple Super Bowl Wins:

Wins

Player

Grease

4

Joe Montana*

No

4

Terry Bradshaw*

Yes

3

Troy Aikman*

Yes

3

Tom Brady

Yes

2

Bart Starr*

No

2

Bob Griese*

Yes

2

Roger Staubach*

No

2

Jim Plunkett

No

2

John Elway*

No

2

Ben Roethlisberger

Yes

2

Eli Manning

No

 

Jan 02 2014

Doc Emrick is Awesome (Farkas Eye Black at the 2014 NHL Winter Classic)

Three quarters of a century ago the eye black was created by a Washington Redskins football player Andy Farkas, who then founded the company, Farkas Eye Black… Parents watching, in case your youngsters have now decided they want eye black all the time, I checked on the Internet: $14.95 for a tin. - Jan 1, 2014 On Air Comment by NBC's Doc Emrick during the 2014 NHL Winter Classic at University of Michigan's Big House in Ann Arbor.     

 

Yesterday, the NHL hosted its sixth Winter Classic since it started the event in 2008. The event featured a record crowd of 105,491 at University of Michigan's Big House in Ann Arbor (the highest-attended game in NHL history). The 2014 Winter Classic also tied a television ratings record with the 2009 Winter Classic between Detroit and Chicago at Wrigley Field. Detroit was the leading television market for the game, with an 18.0 rating. The Winter Classic was also the first to feature a Canadian team as well as the first Winter Classic to hold events in two locations – the Hockeytown Winter Festival and NHL Alumni Showdown were hosted at Comerica Park as part of the Winter Classic. The game was one of six scheduled outdoor hockey games for the 2013-14 NHL season.

Farkas Eye Black was thankful to NBC commentator, Doc Emrick, for mentioning Farkas Eye Black during his broadcast. While eye black is not traditionally associated with hockey, the benefits of wearing eye black grease are still relevant in hockey games. Whether in “backyard” hockey games like the Winter Classic, which are outdoors, or inside the conventional hockey rink, eye black will help reduce glare from both sunlight and stadium lights.

Be sure to catch the NHL Stadium Series later this month and the 2014 Heritage Classic for more outdoor hockey games this NHL season!

 

Farkas Eye Black recently signed a licensing deal with Notre Dame.

 

 

Dec 26 2013

University of Notre Dame and Farkas Eye Black Sign Licensing Deal

 

Detroit, MI (December 23, 2013) – Farkas Eye Black announced today that it has signed its first licensing deal with the University of Notre Dame. This is the first licensing deal for the Detroit-area company.


“Farkas Eye Black has been a staple in the Fighting Irish football locker room for a number of years now,” noted company advisor, Jeff Faine, himself a former Notre Dame and NFL center. “I am obviously thrilled that they are our first licensing partner, and we are looking to use their partnership as a model for other college and professional programs” said Faine.


Faine credits another Detroit area company as being the difference maker in getting the deal done. “Notre Dame accepts about 10% of licensing applicants and we were fortunate to have been put in a favorable position thanks to a strong assist from Patrick McInnis, the CEO of Fathead”, added Faine. Fathead is the industry leader of officially licensed sports and entertainment graphics as well as custom décor and more. Fathead is headquartered in downtown Detroit.


Farkas Eye Black was founded in the name of Andy “Anvil” Farkas by his grandchildren Katie (Farkas) Gates and Brian Farkas. Farkas changed the face of the American Athlete when he became the first player to wear Eye Black in the NFL. The standout fullback laid those groundbreaking lines under his eyes in 1942, and led the Washington Redskins to the World Championship. An All-American out of the University of Detroit (1937), Farkas played 7 seasons with Washington and capped his career with the Detroit Lions in 1945. In 2002, the Redskins named Farkas as one of the 70 Greatest Redskins of all time.


Farkas Eye Black encourages everyone to “Play with Passion” and they are committed to providing athletes the best eye black on the market.

http://farkaseyeblack.com

@FarkasEyeBlack

Facebook.com/FarkasEyeBlack

The Farkas Eye Black formula was created under the direction of Yale Ophthalmologist Dr. Brian DeBroff.

Jul 24 2013

Eye Black Design Toil & Trouble

By: Ronnie Kadykowski

While eye black has evolved very little in terms of the materials used, grease remaining a staple over the years and stickers being the only new product introduced in the field, the application of eye black has been modified tremendously over the years, especially in the last decade. Players have gone from single strips of grease under the eyes, to intimidating designs, full-face painting, and even writing on stickers (we know Farkas wearers would never do such a thing). But in recent years, the National Federation for State High School Associations (NFHS) and NCAA have put in place rules to restrict eye black personalization.

As ESPN writer Paul Lukas noted in his 2006 article, personalizing eye black started really gaining momentum around 2004 and 2005. Lukas notes, “It's not clear who was the first player to personalize his eye black stickers. But the trend clearly hit the big time with Reggie Bush, who famously adorned his cheekbones with "619" (his home area code) and "S-E" (for his hometown's southeastern location in San Diego county)... After that, the floodgates opened.”

Since then, players at every level have transformed grease and stickers alike to make various “war-paint-like” designs. Lukas talks briefly about how Major League Baseball and the NFL had instituted rules limiting eye black designs by the time he had written his article. Nevertheless, professional athletes (especially NFL players) continued to come up with new designs that pushed the rules.

In 2010, the NCAA banned the writing of messages on eye black stickers in college football (which was just as well, because we know stickers don’t provide any glare reduction). While that rule change became well known and enforced, a lesser-known rule that went into effect the following year was NFHS Rule 1-5-3c. This rule stated that eye black shading must be applied using a single stroke under the eye and is not to be made into any designs or include any wording.

The rule seems pretty straight forward, but it’s more than two years later and high school athletes in football, baseball, lacrosse and other sports are continuing to sport their favorite eye black designs. Lacrosse has possibly become the best-known sport to go all out on eye black designs, with athletes layering their faces in eye black before every game as if preparing for battle. 

Yet, that trend has come under more enforcement this year through state high school athletic associations. While Massachusetts (MIAA) seems to have been ahead of other states (instituting rule 48.2 sometime in the mid 2000s banning excessive eye black), New York and New Jersey put in similar rules this April requiring athletes to place only one strip under the eyes. (It should be noted that the MIAA rule has been modified from only one strip of eye black allowed under the eyes prior to 2010 to “Athletic participants may wear sun glare black only under their eyes” in 2011).

While this “double, double” enforcement by state high school athletic associations may spell toil and trouble for the fun of lacrosse players and other high school athletes nationwide, the art of eye black designs has not been entirely lost. In looking at the most up to date NCAA rules publications for football, baseball, softball, lacrosse (men’s and women’s), and soccer, I found no rules to limit the application of eye black grease. In fact, the only mention of eye black in any of the aforementioned NCAA sports comes in football, where Rule 1-4-6e states, “Any shading under a player’s eyes must be solid black with no words, numbers, logos or other symbols.”

So as long as the eye black is under the eyes, college athletes can continue to have fun with eye black designs until any future rules changes are created. And for high school athletes, check your state high school athletic associations rules and determine how you can wear your eye black – but please, no stickers.

 

Jul 12 2013

College Football Games Going More International Than Ever Before

By: Ronnie Kadykowski

In December 2011, Pac-12 Conference Commissioner, Larry Scott, said that he wanted to promote and play Pac-12 sports in the Chinese market. Well, on Wednesday, Scott once again brought up the notion of playing Pac-12 sports in China, this time talking about playing football games across the Pacific.

In an interview with Bryan Fischer on the Pac-12 blog, Scott said that he thinks “… [The Pac-12] will have football [in China] at some stage.” For right now though, the conference sees a more immediate future for sports such as basketball and volleyball. The UCLA men’s basketball team just played in Shanghai last summer and a Pac-12 all-star volleyball team returned from a tour of China this past week. Still, while college football games in China are a relatively new idea, international games are of interest to many collegiate programs.

  

2012 Emerald Isle Classic                     Photo:Matt Cashore-US PRESSWIRE

Last September, Notre Dame and Navy faced off in the Emerald Isle Classic at Croke Park in Dublin, Ireland marking the second meeting of the two storied college football programs in Ireland, the first coming in 1996. The 2012 Emerald Isle Classic was a great success for both the schools and Ireland itself, bringing in an estimated €25 million and 30,000 American tourists. Also, the game had a sold out crowd of 48,820 and was nationally televised in both the U.S. and Ireland on NBC and RTE respectively.

With such success from the 2012 Emerald Isle Classic, it’s not a surprise that more teams are looking to potentially play in Ireland (and internationally) as well. Penn State and Central Florida (UCF) have a tentatively scheduled game in Ireland for the 2014 season. Reports in the Orlando Sentinel and other sources predict the game may be officially announced this Sunday.

Additionally, the Irish publication, The Journal, indicates that Notre Dame, Alabama, and Boston College are being considered as teams to play at Croke Stadium in 2016 and 2018. The Gaelic Athletic Association has already reportedly approached Notre Dame about potentially playing in the 2016 matchup.

The international outreach of college football doesn’t seem to be stopping with just Ireland, however. Brett McMurphy of ESPN reported in June that the MAC, Sun Belt, Conference USA, American Athletic Conference, and Mountain West are considering playing bowl games in Ireland, Dubai, Toronto, or Nassau. As Yahoo Sports notes, though, scheduling bowl games in international locales (except Toronto) would be very pricey as far as travel expenses are concerned. Scheduling a game in Ireland two years in advance is one thing… scheduling a bowl game in Dubai with a three-week time frame is entirely different.

Nevertheless, the impending moves by the Pac-12 and other college football programs to play internationally seem to have strong momentum and even stronger incentives. “I would like the Pac-12 to be seen [outside the U.S. and in China] as the elite athletic conference in the United States with some of the best-known brands,” Scott said. “In the long run, the Pac-12 Globalization Initiative can become a great vehicle to augment our member institutions’ existing efforts to build their brands and expand opportunities in China.”

And right now, that plan starts by playing high-profile games overseas.

 

 

 

Quotes are taken from aforementioned interview by Bryan Fischer and press release issued by Pac-12 on Wednesday, July 10.

Jul 04 2013

Independence Day Sports Moments

 By: Ronnie Kadykowski


Fourth of July is a day full of sports history moments. From bullfighting to Wimbledon, this day has its fair share of great achievements in sports history. Here’s a list of some memorable July 4th American sports moments dating back to 1884.

1884 – The first U.S. bullfight took place in Dodge City, Kansas on July 4th and 5th. The event featured imported bullfighters from Mexico and was met with nation-wide protest for its “barbarism”.

1888 – The first official rodeo competition took place in Prescott, Arizona. Originally called a “cowboy tournament” the event was organized by businessmen and merchants and rewarded winners with cash prizes. Much of rodeo’s roots can be traced back to Spain and the vaquero traditions.

1910 – Jack Johnson knocked out James Jeffries in 15 rounds to become the first African American world heavyweight boxing champion. Deemed “The Fight of the Century”, Jeffries had come out of a six-year retirement to defeat Johnson in the racially charged bout. Historians are mixed and say that Johnson was awarded between $65,000 and $225,000 for the fight but they do agree that Johnson won recognition from all of his critics; however, the bout resulted in race riots around the country.

 

 

1914 – The first U.S. motorcycle race took place in Dodge City, Kansas. The event drew in 17,000 spectators and became the premier motorcycle race of its era. Dodge City is proposing to bring back the race in 2014 to celebrate its 100th anniversary.

1919 – Jack Dempsey knocked out Jess Willard in round four to win the world heavyweight title. Dempsey would hold the title until 1926 when Gene Tunney defeated him. Dempsey and Tunney would meet again one year later in the fight that would become known as “The Long Count” for its controversial refereeing. Dempsey lost by knockout.

1930 – Longtime New York Yankees owner George Steinbrenner was born. Under Steinbrenner the Yankees won seven World Series. Steinbrenner owned the Yankees for 37 years from 1973 until his passing in 2010.

1934 – Joe Louis made his professional boxing debut in Chicago’s South Side. Louis would go on to defeat James Braddock and win the heavyweight title in 1937. From there, Louis made a record 25 title defenses and held his heavyweight title for the rest of his career until retirement in March 1949. 

1939 – Lou Gehrig had his number 4 retired at Yankee stadium. An ailing Gehrig was reported to have given one of the most memorable speeches in baseball history at the ceremony. His jersey retirement was the first ever in Major League Baseball.

1950 – Boston Braves slugger Sid Gordon hit a grand slam bringing his season total to four and tying the then Major League record.

1960 – Mickey Mantle became the 18th player to hit 300 home runs. Mantle finished his career with 536 home runs.

1960 – Mickey Wright won the 6th LPGA Championship. Wright finished her career with 13 major championships and 82 Tour wins, which is second all-time behind Kathy Whitworth who had 88 Tour wins.

1962 – Tennis player Pam Shriver was born. Shriver finished her career with 22 Grand Slam doubles titles and a gold medal at the 1988 Olympic Games.

1965 – Chicago Bulls/Orlando Magic Power Forward Horace Grant was born. Grant won three NBA titles with the Bulls in his seven seasons with the team. He would win another title with the Magic in 2001. Grant also played two seasons with the Lakers and one season with the Super Sonics.

1974 – NFL Defensive Tackle, La’Roi Glover, was born. Glover was a six-time Pro Bowl selection in his 13-year career. He played for the Rams, Cowboys, Saints, and Raiders.

1976 – Philadelphia Phillies catcher Tim McCarver hit what should have been a Grand Slam homerun. But, the hit would become known as a “Grand Slam Single,” because McCarver passed his teammate Garry Maddox on the bases. The Phillies beat the Pirates anyway, 10-5.

1980 – Nolan Ryan earned his 3,000th strikeout by thwarting Ceasar Geronimo at the plate. Ryan finished his 27-year career with 5,714 strikeouts and seven no-hitters, both major league records by considerable margins (839 and 3 respectively). Despite his seven no-hitters, Ryan never pitched a perfect game. Other the Jackie Robinson, Ryan is the only major league player to have had his number retired by 3 teams (Robinson’s number is retired for all MLB teams).

1983 – Yankees pitcher Dave Righetti throws a no-hitter in 4-0 win over the Boston Red Sox. Righetti was a two-time All-Star and has won two World Series as a coach of the San Francisco Giants.

1984 – Richard Petty won the Firecracker 400 at Daytona to earn his 200th career victory. After the race, Petty went to the press box instead of Victory Lane to meet President Ronald Reagan who was in attendance. Reagan was the first sitting president to attend a race. The win was the last of Petty’s storied career in which he finished with a record seven Daytona 500 victories and over 700 top-ten finishes.

1993 – Pete Sampras defeated Jim Courier in four sets in an All-American final at Wimbledon. The win marked the first of seven titles for Sampras at the All England Club. Sampras finished his career with 14 Grand Slam singles titles.

1999 – Jose Canseco, playing as a Tampa Bay Devil Ray, became the first player in Major League history to hit 30 home runs with four different teams. The other teams were the Oakland A’s, Texas Rangers, and Toronto Blue Jays.

2001 – At just 23 years old, Team USA soccer captain, Cindy Parlow, became the youngest player in U.S. history to compete in 100 international appearances. Team USA defeated Canada 1-0. Parlow finished her playing career as a two-time Olympic gold medalist and now is the head coach for the Portland Thorns FC.

2006 – New York Mets closer Billy Wagner became the 20th pitcher in Major League Baseball history to record 300 career saves when he caused Juan Castillo to hit into a fielder’s choice final out.  Wagner finished his career in 2010 with 422 saves, placing him fifth all-time among Major League pitchers.

 

 

Sources: Bleacher Report, NBC Sports, Wikipedia, Brainy History, Skyways, and WorldsOldestRodeo.com.

Jun 27 2013

College Football 2013 Conferences

By: Ronnie Kadykowski


 

Yes, it’s only June and college football doesn’t kick off until August 29th, but July 1st will effectively mark the start of new conference changes for teams in this upcoming 2013-2014 athletics season. And after reading Andy Staples report card for teams making conference moves on SI.com earlier this month, we thought it best to clarify exactly who is playing in which conference this upcoming football season.

Since Colorado first made the move to the Pac-10 (now Pac-12) in 2010, there have been 83 different conference changes by teams. That number discounts Colorado’s move, but does account for all non-football moves and also includes the move of the “Catholic Seven” to form the American Athletic Conference (new-Big East).

Nevertheless, it’s safe to say a lot has happened in the last three years. Yet, not all of those changes will take effect this fall as teams like Maryland and Louisville won’t make the move to their new conferences (Big Ten & ACC respectively) until next summer. With changes for the 2013 season officially taking effect on Monday, we thought we’d get you up to speed on how the college football landscape will look this fall.

For starters, here is a list of schools making the move to a new conference this season:

 

The only schools from BCS conferences making changes this season are Pittsburgh and Syracuse both leaving the now defunct Big East and starting play in the ACC this fall. The Western Athletic Conference (WAC) will no longer be fielding a football conference as its respective teams make moves to other conferences. One team is making the transition from the FCS to the FBS this season, and that’s the Georgia State Panthers who will play in the Sun Belt. Lots of changes are on the horizon for 2014, though, as a total of 14 teams will make changes to new conferences, a number that includes five additions from FCS (including the University of Michigan’s all-time favorite FCS opponent, Appalachian State). Here’s a list of those teams playing their final season in their current conference and the conference they will make their move to in 2014 (or 2015 for Charlotte).



But wait, that’s fine and dandy, the chart covers the moves of the major programs Maryland, Louisville, and Rutgers, but what about those pesky Fighting Irish from Notre Dame? I thought they were moving to the ACC in 2014? Yes and no. Of course, Notre Dame will maintain its football independence for the indefinite future, but will move to the ACC in every other sport (except hockey) starting this season. However, the caveat you may be thinking of starts in the 2014 football season, when Notre Dame will annually schedule five games against ACC opponents, while also gaining access rights to ACC bowl games. So Notre Dame remains independent in football, doesn’t technically join the ACC (in football), but is required to play five games a year against ACC teams and can play in ACC bowl games.

In summary, the SEC, Big Ten, Pac-12, and Big 12 will not change at all for the 2013 football seasons, nor will the SEC, Pac-12, or Big 12 see any changes for 2014. The Big East is now gone, replaced by the American Athletic Conference, and the ACC will see some new teams joining their conference both in 2013 and 2014. Here is how these six respective conferences will look this upcoming season:




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